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AARP: Concerns about Social Security ignored during debate

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An official with AARP said Monday that voters concerned about the future of Social Security got no answers during Sunday night’s presidential debate.

"Opinions on who won Sunday night's Presidential debate will vary but who lost is clear: the millions of American voters who want to understand how the candidates would keep Social Security strong for future generations," said John Hishta, AARP senior vice president for campaigns.

"The debate was the best chance for voters to get real answers on how the Presidential candidates would address Social Security's significant financial challenges," Hishta said.

"Failing to ask a question about how to fix Social Security disregarded thousands of voters who contacted the debate moderators via social media to urge them to ask the candidates how they'll lead on Social Security.  We will now turn our attention to pressing Fox'sChris Wallaceto answer voters' call for the answers they deserve beforeElection Day," he said.

Social Security faces a significant revenue shortfall that, while still a number of years away, would result in a nearly 25 percent, across-the-board benefits cut for all Social Security recipients if left unaddressed.

Despite recent polling in support of more focus on the issue, it has been largely ignored in this election.  A battleground AARP survey of Boomer women found 71 percent want the next president and congress to address Social Security immediately and more than two-thirds have heard nothing about the candidates' plans, AARP said.

 

 

"Opinions on who won Sunday night's Presidential debate will vary but who lost is clear: the millions of American voters who want to understand how the candidates would keep Social Security strong for future generations," AARP Senior Vice President, Campaigns, John Hishtasaid.

"The debate was the best chance for voters to get real answers on how the Presidential candidates would address Social Security's significant financial challenges," Hishta said.

"Failing to ask a question about how to fix Social Security disregarded thousands of voters who contacted the debate moderators via social media to urge them to ask the candidates how they'll lead on Social Security.  We will now turn our attention to pressing Fox's Chris Wallace to answer voters' call for the answers they deserve before Election Day," he said.

Social Security faces a significant revenue shortfall that, while still a number of years away, would result in a nearly 25 percent, across-the-board benefits cut for all Social Security recipients if left unaddressed. Despite recent polling in support of more focus on the issue, it has been largely ignored in this election.  A battleground AARP survey of Boomer women found 71 percent want the next president and congress to address Social Security immediately and more than two-thirds have heard nothing about the candidates' plans, AARP said.